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Founded in 1979, the LPFA is an official non-profit 501(c)(3) partner of the Los Padres National Forest.  Our mission is to care for the Los Padres Forest, ensuring it thrives and remains safe and open for the people to use and enjoy.

The LPFA shares the Forest Service motto of “Caring for the Land and Serving the People.”  We love nothing more than to help people enjoy their time in the Los Padres in a sustainable and respectful manner.  If you have any questions about the forest, trails, camps or anything Los Padres related – we are more than happy to help!

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While we have you, feel free to browse around and check out all the cool things we have going on across the forest……….

The Los Padres National Forest is the second largest forest in California.  It stretches across the central coast from Los Angeles County up to Monterey.  There are 10 designated wilderness areas within the Los Padres, along with thousands of miles of trails and some of the most spectacular natural wildlife and scenery.  With elevations ranging from sea level to almost 9,000ft, the Los Padres offers a wide assortment of recreational activities including surfing, skiing, hunting, backpacking, mountain biking, bird watching or sitting next to a creek reading a book.  It is also home to thousands of black bear, mountain lion, steelhead trout and of course the iconic California condor.

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Maybe the most amazing thing about the Los Padres is that it is located within a few hours of over 25,000,000 people!  In today’s hurried world of devices pinging at you, urban sprawl and constant availability; having the option to get out of town and spend time in the mountains away from the chaos is something so simple, yet so hard to achieve.  We need places like the Los Padres and these places need groups like the LPFA helping keep them wild and open.

The LPFA helps coordinate volunteer projects across the Los Padres Forest. Our volunteers work to keep trails open, report and assess forest conditions and provide public education on how to safely use the forest.  Shoot us an email if you are interested in learning more about the LPFA, would like to volunteer or would like to sign up for our weekly Los Padres E-Newsletter.

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Click above and below to see bears being bears
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-Today was a good day! & a busy day in the SB Ranger District for the LPFA -Installed the first of 35 new interpretive signs at Falls.-Surveyed Middle Camuesa Camp for continued camp improvements and renovations.-Staged supplies for additional campground improvements at Happy Hollow CG atop Little Pine.-LPFA Trail Crew continued working on the Buckhorn OHV.- Measured signs along the Buckhorn for repairs next week.-Salvaged and rescued some historic LP signs.--#whew #lotsgoingon #todaywasagoodday #todaywasabusyday #cantwaittoseewhattomorrowbrings #happyhollowcampground #littlepinemountain #camuesaroad #middlecamuesacamp #signssignseverywheresigns #foresthelp #lospadresnationalforest #lpfatrailcrew #buckhornroad ... See MoreSee Less

1 day ago  ·  

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-THANKSGIVING WORK ON THE CONDOR TRAIL-We'd heard recent reports via HikeLosPadres.com of lost hikers and downed trees along the Sisquoc Trail portion of the Condor Trail and so.... with visions of #GivingTuesday dancing in our head, the LPFA took advantage of the exceptional Thanksgiving weather and led a group of volunteers to tackle some crosscut and brushing work along the Condor Trail.-While the trail clearing was great and very productive, even better was the regrowth we are finally witnessing after the 2007 Zaca Fire. Pre-Zaca, this portion of the Upper Sisquoc was predominantly manzanita, cedar and pine but was replaced with mainly spiny ceanothus after being nuked by Zaca. It's been over 14 years now and we're FINALLY seeing the cedars, pines and manzanita gaining ground on the ceanothus. We've interviewed Forest Service experts who say that in areas like the Upper Sisquoc it might take 30 years for vegetation to return after a fire and another 30+ to reach maturity. We're witnessing it first hand.-As part of #GivingTuesday the LPFA is hoping to raise funds to continue trail work along the Condor Trail. Check out www.LPForest.org for more details on how you can help!--#lospadresnationalforest #crosscut #optoutside #zacafire #postfireregrowth #witnessfirsthand #volunteertrailwork #yeehaw #condortrail #hikelospadres #GivingTuesday2021 ... See MoreSee Less

3 days ago  ·  

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-So much to be thankful for!-#explore -#lospadresnationalforest #happythanksgivng #whatareyouthankfulfor ? #enjoytheholidays #besafe #getoutside ... See MoreSee Less

1 week ago  ·  

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